To Bahamians in 1958, it probably sounded an awful lot like the Empire cheated local boy sprinter, Tommy Robinson, out of a world record. But, at the Empire Games of July 18 to 26, 1958 in Cardiff, Wales, they said he couldn’t claim the record breaking 9.5 seconds in the 100 yard dash because of the help of the Welsh wind.

(The Ottawa Journal, Thursday 17 July 1958)


WIND AND SHORT RACES

If you have ever watched competitive sprinting events, you may have heard numerous references to wind velocity.

The direction and force of wind plays a big deal in sprinting races, like the 100m and 200m dash. Wind, depending on its velocity, can either help or hinder athletes. Wind can be a factor in their finishing times.

Mostly, all of the runners for a particular race face the same wind and weather conditions because they are running at the same time. But, if runners are competing at different times or at different places, they will face varying conditions.

Certain races might be thrown out if it is deemed that the wind helped the time of the runner. For example, On May 31, 2008, Usain Bolt ran the 100m in a time of 9.72 seconds with a +1.7m/s wind, officially breaking the 100 meter world record. But on June 29, 2008, Tyson Gay ran the 100m with a fantastic finishing time of 9.68 seconds with +4.1m/s wind. Although Gay had the faster time, he did not get the accolade of a world record.


ROBINSON BREAKS THE RECORD BY ONE / ONE-HUNDREDTH OF A SECOND BUT IT IS NOT RECORDED

A “following wind” is what they called it. Tom, Thomas, or Tommy as he was referred to by different newspapers was a one-man team, representing the Bahamas, to the Empire Games in 1958.

(The Ottawa Journal, Thursday 17 July 1958)


TOM ROBINSON TAKES GOLD IN THE 220 YARD DASH BEATING JAMAICAN KEITH GARDNER

(The Philadelphia Enquirer Friday 25, July 1958)

Please follow and like us: